Halloween Rice Treats Made Easy

Posted by on October 5, 2009

When Rice Krispies® cereal was first introduced in 1928, people took note of the distinctive sound the cereal made in milk. From that sound came the first (and longest-lasting) spokescharacters for the Kellogg’s® company.

The words SNAP! CRACKLE! POP!™ first appeared on the front of a Kellogg’s® Rice Krispies® cereal package in 1932. By the following year, a tiny gnome wearing a baker’s hat and carrying a spoon (SNAP!™) topped a side panel. CRACKLE!™ and POP!™ joined him in print ads in the early 1930s.

In 1949, SNAP! CRACKLE! POP!™ changed drastically from gnomes with huge noses, ears and oversized hats to more human creatures with boyish haircuts, proportional features and smaller hats.Here’s how Snap! Crackle! Pop!™ are known in other languages/countries around the world:

Belgium – Pif! Paf! Pof!
Denmark – Pif! Paf! Puf!
Finland – Poks! Riks! Raks!
Germany – Knisper! Knasper! Knusper!
Holland – Pif! Paf! Pof!
Italy – Pif! Paf! Pof!
Norway – Piff! Paff! Puff!
Sweden – Piff! Paff! Puff!
Switzerland – Piff! Paff! Poff!
South Africa – Knap! Knaetter! Knak!
Canadian French – Cric! Crac! Croc!
Mexico – Pim! Pum! Pam!

And now for the “sweet treat” portion of today’s hint. OK, so it’s not a new recipe – Rice Krispies® Treats have been around since 1939. Can you believe we’ve been enjoying them for 70 years? I’ve given you the original recipe from the Rice Krispies® website below, with my Halloween twist. This is a great activity to get the kids involved in the kitchen!

Rice Krispies® Trick-or-Treats

3 T. butter or margarine
1 10 oz. package regular marshmallows
6 c. Rice Krispies®
Semisweet chocolate morsels
White chocolate morsels
Cinnamon decorating buttons (in the cake decorating section of the grocery), optional
Black cake decorating gel

1. In large saucepan melt butter over low heat. Add marshmallows and stir until completely melted. Remove from heat.

2. Add the Rice Krispies® cereal and stir until well coated.

3. Using a spatula sprayed with non-stick cooking spray or waxed paper, evenly press the mixture into a 13x9x2 inch pan coated with cooking spray.

4. Cool 10 minutes and cut with Halloween-shaped cookie cutters. (Tip: Spray a bit of cooking spray on the inside of the cutter and use a finger to evenly coat the entire inside surface of the cutter. Carefully remove the treat from the cutter, smooth edges as necessary and place on a baking sheet. Cool completely.

5. Melt about ½ cup of semisweet morsels (the amount will depend on the number of treats you’re dipping) in a microwave-safe bowl in 30-second increments, stirring after each increment until all the morsels are melted. Dip bat shapes into the chocolate and then smooth the chocolate with a small knife or spatula if needed. Decorate with 2 cinnamon buttons for eyes.

6. Melt about 1 cup of white chocolate morsels (the amount will depend on the number of treats you’re dipping) in a microwave-safe bowl in 30-second increments, stirring after each increment until all the morsels are melted. Dip ghost shapes into the white chocolate and then smooth with a small knife or spatula if needed.

7. Tint remaining white chocolate with food coloring to make it orange. Dip pumpkin shapes and then smooth with a small knife or spatula if needed.

8. Decorate ghosts and pumpkins with black cake decorating gel. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Yield: about 16 shapes.

Notes and hints:
* For best results, use fresh marshmallows.
* 4 c. miniature marshmallows or 1 jar (7 oz.) marshmallow crème may be substituted for marshmallows.
* Diet, reduced calorie or tub margarine is not recommended.
* Best if served the same day. To freeze, place in layers separated by waxed paper in an airtight container.
* Michaels craft store carries individual Halloween-shaped cookie cutters for around 80 cents each.
* Vanilla or chocolate canned icing may substituted for the white and semisweet morsels. (I keep morsels in the pantry, so I used morsels.)